To Best Fight Cancer – Exercise

Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself – Leo Tolstoy #change

With the constant arrival of quick weight loss diets and regimens, it’s evident that both Americans and our overseas brothers and sisters are searching for ways to lose a few pounds.

There’s an unknown and minutely discussed difference of weight loss vs. weight management. If you were to ask the general population, at first thought you would probably get answer considering weight loss and weight management are one in the same. Likewise, consensus would probably tell us that majority of population would consider aerobic exercise as the number one means to effectively lose weight. And I would agree that if you’re desiring a degree of weight “loss” than aerobic exercise gets the most drawings.

So then, the effect of developing lean (muscle) mass, to a novice exerciser, wouldn’t seem attractive. However, let it be known that though, muscle mass simply weighs more, gram for gram, than fat, an increase in lean mass is NOT counterproductive. When you increase muscle mass you decrease fat storage.  That’s to mean if you jump on the scale during a time where you’re performing resistance exercise and don’t like the results on the scale don’t freak out you’re still doing well.

I figured this particular misconceived notion needed addressing, after a young lady approached my colleagues and I at the gym and was visibly disappointed after weighing herself. At times, as a whole, whether seasoned veterans or novice exerciser we need to step back and applaud the effort and work we put in to change ourselves.

Exercising presents so many great benefits. Resistance training has more to offer than just strength and size. Did you know that a number of physicians and researchers are  now saying that “people who remain physically active as best they can during treatment are more likely to beat cancer.” 

Would you think the importance of understanding the difference between weight loss for the sake of losing weight and the long-term benefits of an increased lean mass and reduced fat ratio is now validated?

Often, popular diets leave out the four important components that can lead to long-term success:

  1.  Aerobic Exercise
  2. Resistance Training
  3. Nutrition
  4. Rest & Recovery

Follow this simple plan and you’ll open the door to improved – and sustainable – energy efficiency.

According to director of nutrition and physical activity of American Cancer Society, Collen Doyle, “Exercise is so important for cancer patients, but so many doctors and health professionals are concerned about safety issues — is it safe for people undergoing treatment to exercise?”

Answer: Yes, it is!

Benefits researchers have shown include treatment having a greater effective role when implementing exercise to their daily regimen.

Other exercise benefits for cancer patients and survivors include:

  • reduced fatigue
  • reduced loss of muscle ad bone mass
  • improved quality of life
Now let’s keep things into perspective, nobody expects a chemotherapy cancer patient to exert themselves at the same level as a healthy person, however, your goal is to keep from being inactive the best you can. Likewise, expect workout plans that are indicative of your current capabilities.
Signs of exercise benefits are well received in the medical arena that physicians even recommend a workout plan starting with onset of diagnosis, “…it can still be of some help”, said Dr. Eleanor M. Walker, division director of breast services in the radiation oncology department at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit and lead author of an ongoing study on exercise for cancer patients.
 
Here are 12 Tips for Cancer Prevention:
  1. Avoid HIGH doses of fructose and sugar
  2. Optimum level of Vitamin D
  3. Exercise
  4. Optimum level of animal-based omega-3 fat
  5. Eat according to what your body is designed to eat
  6. Reduce your stress level with engaging activities
  7. Implement MORE veggies
  8. Maintain YOUR ideal weight
  9. ZZzzz glorious ZZZzzz adequate sleep
  10. Limit your exposure to toxins
  11. Safe strategies using cellphones and other wireless technologies
  12. Avoid frying or charbroiling foods when possible
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About foodfrommyheart

Guided by the primary principle People First. Likewise, motivated by 5 Core Values: Quality, Trust, Integrity, Changing Lives, & Giving Back.

Posted on October 19, 2011, in Cancer and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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