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The Soy Difference

5 Myths about Soy:

* All  Soy Food is the same
* Soymilk doesn’t provide calcium
* Soy upsets your stomach
* Soy contains “Anti-Nutrients” that interfere with mineral absorption
* Unfermented Soy is Toxic

Soy Benefits:

As I commented earlier this week, via Twitter, soy protein is the only commonly consumed plant protein that is nutritionally complete. With soy’s unique blend containing all of the underlying amino acids in acceptable quantities to help meet the body’s requirement, the medical and nutrition arenas, including the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), admit soy protein to be as equal in quality to animal protein, minus high saturated fat.

More so, soymilk is an excellent option to dairy milk. When in comparing to cow’s milk, soymilk provides many of the same key nutrients, which includes calcium, vitamin D, and protein.

Why should you implement soy in your diet?

For starters, soymilk is very low in saturated fat and is cholesterol-free, thereby making soy a favorable choice for individuals with heart health concern. In a composite analysis, according to the World Health Orgainzation (WHO), of 38 clinical trials, subjects that consumed 47 grams of soy protein daily led to a 9% decline in total cholesterol and 13% decline in LDL (low-density lipoprotein), or bad protein (p. 7).

You see, soy has an abundance of isoflavones, phytoestrogen produced chiefly by plants of the legume family, especially soybeans, potentially useful in lowering cholesterol and in treating some cancers and menopausal symptoms. And for those who have a misunderstaning about soy, evidence suggests soy consumption is NOT associated with increased risk of breast cancer recurrence.

Soy is safe. Despite, the known allergens: milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and wheat, soy is harmful to those who are allergic to it. However, this doesn’t indicate any danger for the general population. Furthermore, there’s not enough scientific evidence to suggest soy is more irritating to the stomach that any other foods. As always, those who have concerns should consult with their primary care physician before consumption. While we’re on the subject, improved research techniques show soy foods as a valid source of iron, contrary to prior research stating daily soy consumption to negatively impact mineral balance over a long period of time.

In closing, noted soy foods can play a beneficial role in your diet. Both fermented (miso, natto, tempeh) and unfermented (tofu, soymilk, edamame) deliver high-quality, easily digestible forms of protein.

Here’s to your health,

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